SAT Verbal Section – Words to Remember

Hey guys! As we’ve talked before, studying in general can be stressful. But the SAT? That can be scary and you’ll get worried. That’s why I’m here! Let’s do this!

Here’s a word, Noteworthy. What does it mean though? The definition is: Something worth nothing or paying attention to; significant; meaningful. A sentence can help you also. A sentence is: It was a noteworthy occasion

Noteworthy; adj.
Something worth nothing or paying attention to; significant; meaningful.
It was a noteworthy occasion when the teacher didn’t give her classmates homework.

Profound; adj.
Weighty; insightful; intense; full of meaning or significance.
People who open a Chinese fortune cookie, get really excited but are disappointed when the promise never comes true.

Rarefied; adj.
Belonging to a select or even lofty group; elevated in character; esoteric.
I got pick to be in a club so rarefied that only three other kids made the cut.

Significant; adj.
Of considerable importance or weighty concern.
My little brother being born was a significant memory in my life.

Enjoy All The Benefits

You don’t pay your first hour unless you find it a good fit.

Only pay for the time you need.

No subscriptions or upfront payments.

Find Tutors Near You

- OR -

call us for free to setup tutoring

(800) 417-9186

SAT Essential Words

Hey guys! Here is just some extra practice for the SAT”s. Try to have fun! Good luck!

Spasmodic; adj.
Having the characteristic of a spasm or convulsion.
The doctor said that the medicine could cause spasmodic episodes.

Happening intermittently; from time to time.
The spasmodic sound of fireworks made the little boy frightened.

Sporadic; adj.
Occurring at different intervals, with no set pattern.
The rain this summer has been sporadic, which is why I’ve seen my dad watering the lawn so much.

Transitory;adj.
Short-lived; temporary; only passing, not permanent.
Kami was involved in another of her transitory relationships.

Vacillate; verb.
To move back and forth, especially being unable to make up ones mind.
I vacillated between blue socks or red socks all morning.

Habitual; adj.
Naturally out of habit or routine; regular and common.
It became habitual for Joseph to brush his teeth every morning.

Incessant; adj.
Continuing without interruption, sometimes to an excessive degree.
In incessant snow was becoming overwhelming for my stressed mom.

Impalpable; adj.
Not able to be grasped, held, or understood.
Tess struggled with math because she felt it was impalpable.

Incidental; adj.
Having little or no importance or impact.
The hurricane caused Jo destruction so it was incidental.

Irrelevant; adj.
Unrelated to the matter being considered.
Taylor’s answer to the question was very irrelevant.

Modicum; adj.
A small, very modest, or token amount.
Billy took a modicum of Jesse’s birthday cake.

Nonessential; adj.
Not essential; of little or trivial importance.
When Sadie looked on Google, she found a lot of nonessential information to what she was looking for.

Whit; noun.
The least bit; just an iota.
Savanah didn’t give a whit about finishing her math homework.

Considerable; adj.
In a large or impressive amount or significance.
The teacher found her suggestion considerable.

Intense; adj.
Of extreme degree, characteristics,strength, or effort.
Alex’s training was so intense that she won a gold medal.

Momentous; adj.
Significant and meaningful; sometimes even historically important.
Jonathan made a momentous decision to throw the football which led them to a victory.

Enjoy All The Benefits

You don’t pay your first hour unless you find it a good fit.

Only pay for the time you need.

No subscriptions or upfront payments.

Find Tutors Near You

- OR -

call us for free to setup tutoring

(800) 417-9186

SAT Essential Words for Aptitude Test Like ACT or SAT Exams

Hey folks, studying for the SAT can be stressful, huh? Well, that’s why I’m here, to make it easier for you guys. Here’s a word, Substantial. But what does it actually mean? Substantial is an adjective, here’s the definition: Ample; considerable; sizable; of substance; sometimes even weighty or large in size. We can make this seem easier by creating a sentence. The crowds at the University Mall were so substantial they closed the mall because of trampling. Another word is Apparent. It means: clearly seen; visible; not obscure or confusing. Well, you need to know it from a different perspective. Make a sentence! It was Apparent that Kameron was upset about something even though she tried to deny it. Easy, huh? What does Clarity mean? Here’s a definition: clearness of thought, style or appearance. With sudden Clarity, Maddie understood the situation. Everyone knows how to make sentences. I mean come on, you’ve been doing them since what, like 1st grade? Well, here’s some more:

  • Conspicuous is an adjective; it means: Standing out; clearly exceptional or showy. Here’s a sentence, The conspicuous blue-eyed baby stood out of his brown-eyed brothers.
  • Discernible is an adjective; it means: Clearly understandable through thought or vision. A sentence is, Saturn was discernible in the night sky.
  • Distinct is an adjective; it means: Clearly defined and recognizable; standing out from among its class. A sentence is, Jesse’s distinct style made him recognizable in a room full of people.
  • Evident is an adjective; it means: Worthy of notice; distinguishable. A sentence is, Her textbook was so worn, it was evident it was very old.
  • Limpid is an adjective; it means: Clear and clean; without blemish or confusion. A sentence can be, His limpid eyes said it all, he was truly in love with  Clarisse.
  • Lucidity is an adjective; it means; Clearness or thought; capacity to perceive the thought. The sentence can be, Emily lacked the lucidity to recognize his adoration.
  • Manifest is a verb; it means: To show plainly; to reveal. The sentence is, My mom manifested her anger by taking a break in her room.
  • Obvious is an adjective; it means: Apparent; easily seen or seen through; without subterfuge. If a sentence makes more sense to you this could be the sentence: It was obvious that Kimberly was excited about getting asked out on her first date.
  • Patently is an adverb; it means: Openly; plainly; clearly.Here’s a sentence, It was patently clear that the couple was in an argument. Now that you get the point, Study through these on your own. You can also make up your own sentences if you wish. Good luck! Happy studying!
  • Pellucid; adj. Clear in style, manner, or appearance. Her pellucid attempts to interest the man were useless due to the fact that he already had a girlfriend.
  • Abash; verb. To confuse or distress; to cause perplexity and uncertainty. He abashed his opponent by making funny faces to distract him.
  • Addle; verb. Cause to become unclear or confusing. Ricky addled the frail, old mailman by being rude to the man’s senior position and personal feelings.
  • Anarchy; noun. Confusion and disruption; without clearness in mind or purpose. When the teacher left the room, the students went wild and it resorted to being a total anarchy.
  • Baffle; verb. To confuse; to forestall action or understanding. The girl tried to baffle the boy by confusing him, but he was too clever.
  • Bamboozle; verb. To trick and confuse. The students tried to bamboozle the substitute teacher by saying they were allowed to work in partnerships.
  • Bewilderment; noun. State of being confused, perplexed, and/or disoriented. The girl looked around in bewilderment after she was hit in the head.
  • Confounded; adj. Confused or stunned; totally perplexed. Patty was confounded when her boss granted her a bonus unexpectedly.
  • Din; noun. Loud noise or confusion, usually from a crowd. As she looked upon her fans, the din was so loud she couldn’t hear her own voice.
  • Moil; noun. A situation that is confused, in a turmoil, and/or uncertain. William found himself in such moil, he didn’t know he’d survive another night.
  • Muddle; verb. To think, act, or proceed in a confused or aimless manner. On his first day at a new school, Danny muddled around until he got used to it.

Great job guys! I hope you got the most out of these SAT essential words! Keep studying!

Enjoy All The Benefits

You don’t pay your first hour unless you find it a good fit.

Only pay for the time you need.

No subscriptions or upfront payments.

Find Tutors Near You

- OR -

call us for free to setup tutoring

(800) 417-9186

Staying Motivated

Getting motivated is one thing; staying motivated is another. Which one is harder for you?
In order to stay motivated you should give yourself checkpoints on the way to reaching your goals. These checkpoints might include:

-Monitoring your motivation for learning just as you monitor your comprehension when you read. Each time you sit down to study, ask yourself about the level of motivation for what you are doing. You have an internal “body clock,” which means that you will find that certain times of the day are more conducive to learning than others. Try to plan your study sessions around those times.

-Studying the subjects you find the most difficult, or are least motivated to learn, first. Then move to the subjects that are easier, or those that you enjoy more. In that way you will be more likely to stay motivated to study the subjects you find the most interesting.

-Planning some breaks in your study time-don’t try to study for more than one hour without a short break because you will find it difficult to maintain your motivation.

But what if you find yourself losing motivation? It’s important to have strategies to follow in this scenario as well. It might help if you:

-Take a break and come back to what you were doing at a later time.
-Switch topics every hour or so.
-Work with a study group. Misery loves company and others can often demotivated you.
-Plan to study in the library or another quiet place if you find that your social life is interfering with studying because your friends are calling you or dropping by. Find somewhere to study where you will be free from distractions and temptation.

Excerpt from College Success Strategies by Sherrie L. Nist and Jodi Patrick Holschuh.

Enjoy All The Benefits

You don’t pay your first hour unless you find it a good fit.

Only pay for the time you need.

No subscriptions or upfront payments.

Find Tutors Near You

- OR -

call us for free to setup tutoring

(800) 417-9186

Planning For Midterms and Finals

Is it that time of year again? Midterms? Finals? Do you want to pull your hair out yet? Here are some tried and true tips to help you do your best.

-Plan ahead. Start to rehearse and review your notes and the texts BEFORE exam week so that you can cut down on your workload for the week. Starting early is essential for classes that have cumulative exams because there is so much information to review.

-Cut down on work or other commitments. If you work part-time, ask for some time off or for fewer hours at your job and make sure that your family and friends understand that you will be extra busy. Try not to add any new commitments during midterm and final time.

-Get enough sleep. Pulling all-nighters for a big exam rarely pays off. Instead try to create your schedule for exam week in a way that leaves adequate sleep time. You won’t do well on an exam if you are falling asleep while taking it.

-Study with a partner. Misery loves company and this is never truer than during midterms and finals. Hopefully by the time midterms roll around you have found a study group that works. Study with your group or study partner to keep each other on schedule and motivated to work.

-Don’t panic. The whole world will not stop and does not end because of midterms and finals. If you did thy the pressure is getting to you, readjust your schedule to allow more break time and try to really relax during those breaks. If you find that you have excessive anxiety, get some help before it becomes a stumbling block to doing well.

Excerpt from College Success Strategies by Sherrie L. Nist and Jodi Patrick Holschuh.

Enjoy All The Benefits

You don’t pay your first hour unless you find it a good fit.

Only pay for the time you need.

No subscriptions or upfront payments.

Find Tutors Near You

- OR -

call us for free to setup tutoring

(800) 417-9186

Getting Motivated Through Goal Setting

Goals are great. Amen.

In order to set goals that can be achieved, your goals should be:

-Realistic: Can the goal be achieved? If not, how can the goal be divided into smaller goals? You should try to have short-term, intermediate, and long-term academic goals. A short-term goal is one that you will achieve within the next few days. Intermediate goals are ones that you will achieve within the next few weeks or months. A long-term goal is one that will take longer still, perhaps a fee months or even years. Most people make the mistake of making only intermediate and long-term goals, but short-term goals are also important because they help you follow the progress you are making and they help you stay on track.

-Believable: Do you feel that you will be able to achieve your goal? Being confident about your ability to learn is crucial to your motivation. If you feel that a task is too difficult for you to achieve, your motivation will decrease and you might give up before you even try. Some students believe that they can succeed only in certain topics. If you find yourself believing this, take a minute to reflect on how that negatively affects your motivation to learn in those courses.

-Desirable: How much do you want to reach your goal? In order to succeed in reaching your goals, they should be goals that you really desire. Then, learning will be particularly rewarding or enjoyable to you and it will be easier to achieve. Your goal may be to graduate from college within four years and to land a good job in your field, but you must have the desire for success to reach that type of goal.

-Measurable: How will you know whether or when your goal has been met? Some goals are easy to measure. If your goal is to lose 10 pounds, you will know whether your goal has been met when you weigh yourself. However, sometimes learning goals are not so easy toes sure, so you need to set some standards to help you measure your progress. This may be as simple as taking a few minutes to think about what you have learned after each study session or it may include a more in-depth assessment. In general, you will need more checks of your progress for long-term goals than for short-term goals.

Excerpt from College Success Strategies by Sherrie L. Nist and Jodi Patrick Holschuh.

Enjoy All The Benefits

You don’t pay your first hour unless you find it a good fit.

Only pay for the time you need.

No subscriptions or upfront payments.

Find Tutors Near You

- OR -

call us for free to setup tutoring

(800) 417-9186

What Motivates People?

Read this wonderful section from the book ,

You may not realize it but you are always motivated. No matter where you are or what you are doing, you are always motivated to do something even if it’s just sleeping. Focusing your motivation on learning, however, may be challenging sometimes.

It’s important to understand right from the beginning that you are responsible for your own motivation, even in courses that you don’t like. Although an interesting instructor makes it easier for you do stay motivated, no one can directly motivate you to learn. But given that you are always motivated to do something and that you are primarily responsible for your motivation, there are some differences between students who are motivated to learn and students who are not.

You may have heard the terms INTRINSIC and EXTRINSIC, especially as they relate to motivation. Intrinsic motivation occurs when the activity is its own reward. For example, some people read for the sheer enjoyment, others like to calculate numbers for the pleasure of it. Still others like to conduct experiments for the thrill of discovery. Think of intrinsic privation as being curious about something or doing something you choose to do.

Extrinsic motivation, on the other hand, occurs when your incentive is a reward, such as grades or praise. Think of extrinsic motivation as trying to “get it done” rather than for the sake of learning. For example, you may be failing organic chemistry, but when the professor offers an extra credit assignment, you decide to do it even though you are not motivated to learn in the course. In this case, you are extrinsically motivated to earn extra credit points that can boost your course grade rather than by learning organic chemistry for the sheer pleasure of it.

The more you are intrinsically motivated to learn, the easier learning will be for you. The key to becoming intrinsically motivated, even in classes you don’t particularly like, is to find SOMETHING about the course that you find motivating and try to focus on the positives about the course rather than the negatives. It also helps to focus more in understanding the concepts to be learned rather than focusing solely on grades.

Excerpt from College Success Strategies by Sherrie L. Nist and Jodi Patrick Holschuh.

Enjoy All The Benefits

You don’t pay your first hour unless you find it a good fit.

Only pay for the time you need.

No subscriptions or upfront payments.

Find Tutors Near You

- OR -

call us for free to setup tutoring

(800) 417-9186

What Influences Motivation?

Is it hard for you to be motivated? Learn what influences motivation and find reasons as to why you aren’t motivated.

1. The amount of choice you have about what you are learning. Sometimes your professors will offer you several projects to choose from, or sometimes they will even ask you to choose what topics will be Cortes. Choices like these will help to increase your motivation. However, even if you are not given choices about the class content, college offers you many choices about what you will learn. You choose your major, and to a certain extent you choose the courses you will take, and your course schedule.

2. Your desire to learn. It’s likely that because you are currently enrolled in college you do want to learn, but sometimes you might be required to take courses that you are not particularly interested in.

3. How much you value the subject to be learned. The more you believe the subject to be worthwhile, the easier it will be to become motivated. For example, many colleges require students to take at least one foreign language course. If you believe that it is valuable to learn another language you will feel motivated-perhaps even enough to take a second course. However, if you do not, you may have a harder time motivating yourself to learn in your language course.

Excerpt from College Success Strategies by Sherrie L. Nist and Jodi Patrick Holschuh.

Enjoy All The Benefits

You don’t pay your first hour unless you find it a good fit.

Only pay for the time you need.

No subscriptions or upfront payments.

Find Tutors Near You

- OR -

call us for free to setup tutoring

(800) 417-9186

Timely Tips for Following your Schedule. You can do it baby.

We know, it is darn hard to make yourself follow a schedule that involves things you don’t necessarily want to do. Check out these tips and you’ll be excited when it’s time to study……or maybe not.

-plan to study when you are most alert. If you find that you are tired or you cant concentrate when you study, you probably are not studying at your most alert time. Try to find some blocks of time that are naturally best for you. Some students study best at night, others study best first thing in the morning. Test several times of the day to find out when you are the most ready to study. Experiment with times that you might not initially think are your best times of day-you may surprise yourself and be a morning (or night) person after all.

-spend some time every day on each course you are taking. Even when you don’t have an assignment due, plan some time each day to read the text, review your notes, an prepare for the next class. If you are taking classes that require problem solving such as math or chemistry, it is a good idea to work some problems each night. If you are taking a language class, plan to review new vocabulary or work on verb conjugation every day. By spending some time every day you won’t have to cram for exams because you will always be caught up.

-be specific. The more specific you can be when planning your study schedule, the better because you will know exactly what you need to do each time to study. When you create your schedule, don’t just write down “study.” Instead, write “Read psychology text pages 219-230.”

-prioritize. When you make your schedule, it is helpful to prioritize what you have to do. You might want to label your assignments as “high,” “medium,” or “low” priority.

-make “To Do” lists.

-borrow time-don’t steal it. If you decide to go out for a pizza instead of spending an hour reading your psychology chapter-great. But remember that it’s important to just borrow that time. Be sure to add the activity you missed to your schedule or “to do” list for the next day so that you can make up that time.

-use the time between your classes. Many times students don’t know where all their time goes-an hour in-between classes, two hours between school and work, 15 minutes before classes begin-all of this time adds up and it is useful for getting your work done. You can read for class during hour breaks, review your notes while you are waiting for class to begin, use the time between lunch and class to review, or even meet with a study group in the laundromat. Don’t let this time get “lost.”

-schedule studying breaks. If you plan to study for more than an hour or so at a time, schedule a 10-15 minute break for each hour and a half to two hours of study. You should also plan short breaks when switching from one topic to another so you can give yourself some time to refocus. But be careful that your short breaks don’t turn into long breaks.

-take some time off. Many students feel guilty when they take time off because they are always thinking about the things they “should be doing” such as working on that chemistry lab assignment. But when you have a good schedule, you will be able to reward yourself by taking time off without guilt because you know that you have planned time to get all of your assignments done. So after you have completed your work-relax and enjoy yourself, you deserve it. In fact, you should plan some free time when creating your schedule.

-don’t spin your wheels. If you are having trouble in a course, get some assistance. Seek help from a tutor, a professor, or a friend, anyone who might be able to help. There is nothing that gets in the way of managing your time more than wasting it worrying, rather than doing something productive so that you can be on too of things in a course that is difficult for you. It’s important to get help if you need it and get back on track before you fall too far behind to catch up.

Excerpt from College Success Strategies by Sherrie L. Nist and Jodi Patrick Holschuh.

Enjoy All The Benefits

You don’t pay your first hour unless you find it a good fit.

Only pay for the time you need.

No subscriptions or upfront payments.

Find Tutors Near You

- OR -

call us for free to setup tutoring

(800) 417-9186

Managing Your Time

Once you’re done finally managing yourself-we knew you could do it-learn to manage your time. You have so much time to get your stuff done. Insert some deep quote about the mystery of time here. Let’s get started.

To manage your time effectively, you will need to determine three important pieces of information:

1. What do you need to accomplish? Consider the classes you must attend each week, your work schedule, social commitments, class assignments, and so forth. One of the hardest problems to figure out is how much time an assignment will take. Some of the ability to know how long things will take comes with experience, but the following general rule may help you plan your time: THINGS ALWAYS TAKE LONGER THAN YOU THINK THEY WILL.

2. What things do you currently do that waste your time? Before you can figure out how to spend your time effectively, you need to find out if and how you are wasting time. To do this, think about how you currently spend your days. Are there some things you do that simply waste large amounts of time? How might you restructure your days so that less time is wasted?

3. How can you keep track of what you need to do? Most people who manage their time successfully say that they can’t live without their schedule book or daily planner. It helps them keep track of appointments, assignments, social commitments, and even important phone numbers. If you don’t already use some kind of schedule book invest in one today. Take your schedule book with you to class and be sure to mark down your assignments. But writing things down is only half the battle-you have to make a habit of checking your schedule book every day to see why you need to do.

Excerpt from College Success Strategies by Sherrie L. Nist and Jodi Patrick Holschuh.

Enjoy All The Benefits

You don’t pay your first hour unless you find it a good fit.

Only pay for the time you need.

No subscriptions or upfront payments.

Find Tutors Near You

- OR -

call us for free to setup tutoring

(800) 417-9186
Free Call To Setup Tutoring