How to Study – Tips and Tricks That Work

Sometimes it’s just the basics that you need to do if you want to learn how to study for exams or tests.  Nothing fancy, nothing special – just the basics.  And nothing is more basic than learning how to take good notes and creating note cards that have all the facts, details and specific information that you need for whatever the course may be.  This is really the ultimate way to study for anything to do with spelling or history!  It’s cheap, fast, easy and concise and most of all – it works!

What’s this special tip?  Note cards….Yes, note or index card studying. The best way to do this is throughout the semester as you study at night or at the end of a chapter as you prep for a test or exam.  I’ve seen some do it just for finals but it’s a mind numbing, exhausting and time consuming process if you have to crank out an entire semester’s worth of note cards for most courses.  And it takes longer then to do it than it would if you did it as you were going through the chapter initially.  So to save your brain cells for other things and to save time, create your note cards as you move through each topic, chapter, book or lesson.  You will be so glad that you did it that way!

Yes, there are fancier ways and more technologically advanced ways of accomplishing the same things.  However, I’ve yet to see one that is any faster, easier or less costly.  Nor is there one that I know of that is more effective.  You see this tip requires you to identify the fact, word or concept.  Then you have to write it down and check what you wrote.  So it’s THREE TIMES that you are going over that one point without even knowing that you are drilling it in that often already.

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Words: Paucity to Prodigious

Use some of the words below to describe amounts: “There are SO MANY ants in our yard!”  Sounds much smarter when you say, “There’s a plethora of ants in our yard!”  Say that and you’ll get all the ladies, boys.

  • Paucity; n. Smallness of number.
  • Those in charge of the election were disappointed when they saw the paucity of voters that came.
  • Scarcity of amount.
  • There was a paucity of clean water which caused some panic.
  • Petty; adj. Trivial; of little importance.
  • I am in charge of many things an I must leave the petty details to be taken care of by others.
  • Narrow-minded; shortsighted.
  • Don’t be petty and miss the big picture while being trivial over small details.
  • Mean and grudging.
  • She’s so petty that she’s still mad at me for the wrong I did to her ten years ago.
  • Pittance; n. A very small amount, often referring to an unusually meager amount of money.
  • I only earn a pittance at my current job and that is why I’m looking for new employment.
  • Scant; adj., v. Adjective: Barely sufficient; falling short of a necessary amount; inadequately supplied.
  • Because of the weather, only a scant amount of fans came to the baseball game.
  • Verb: To shortchange or deal with something inadequately or neglectfully.
  • Because of my demanding job, I scant on time with family.
  • Mammoth; n, adj.
  • noun: a great, hairy, prehistoric, elephant-like creature.
  • I have seen a replica of the remains of a prehistoric mammoth.
  • Anything if unusual size.
  • Did you see the mammoth mosquito?

 

  • Adjective: enormous; of great or unusual size or proportions.
  • Driving the enormous truck was a fun experience for me.

 

  • Monumental; adj. Resembling a monument.
  • The monumental gathering for the opening or the store was really fun.

 

  • Exceptionally large, sturdy, or enduring.
  • It may seem like a monumental undertaking but I know it will be worth it to write a book.

 

  • Plethora; n. An excessive amount; a surplus.
  • We had a plethora of jelly beans left over from Easter.

 

  • Prodigious; adj. Excessively great in size, force, or content.
  • The tornado caused such prodigious wind that many trees snapped in half.

 

  • Exceptionally talented.
  • She is a prodigious student in her school. She especially excels in theater.


			
		

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